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Welcome to Harmless

Support at Harmless

Harmless is a user led organisation that provides a range of services about self harm and suicide prevention including support, information, training and consultancy to people who self harm, their friends and families and professionals and those at risk of suicide.

Harmless was set up by people who understand these issues and at the heart of our service is a real sense of hope. We know that with the right support and help life can get better. We hope that you find this site a safe and helpful resource.

Feel free to look around and we welcome your thoughts and feedback about our site and services.

Self Harm & Suicide Prevention Services

Harmless now deliver a range of services and also deliver The Tomorrow Project. In the last ten years we have delivered contracted and funded work for a variety of providers, but are largely self-funded through the selling of training etc. This enables us to preserve long-term and compassionate help for all those that need us.

We provide drop-in, crisis café, short and long-term support and psychotherapy. Under The Tomorrow Project we additionally deliver suicide crisis and bereavement services.

For more information or to volunteer your time and fundraising skills to keep these vital services going, please contact us.

The Harmless Approach

We believe in hope and recovery. We place people with lived experience at the heart of our service, ensuring that we deliver a broad range of service options to meet a variety of needs. Working across age and gender we do our very best to surround the people we help with compassion and practical help and support.

Today, our wonderful colleague & friend Val, has left her Senior Therapist role at Harmless. On her last day, The t… https://t.co/wJNtAB1YWi

Harmless Annual Celebration Event - Saturday 5th October 2019 - Tickets now available! Get yours at:… https://t.co/ZKYiYT5i2F

Please don't suffer in silence, Mental Health is everyone's business. Let us at @HarmlessUK and @lifevssuicide help… https://t.co/1TUC1zTMai

Harmless Workbook: Working Through Self Harm Harmless Workbook

Available in either electronic or hard copy, Harmless have developed this workbook in collaboration with service users, therapists and the Institute of Mental Health to provide a tool that can be used to promote recovery and self reflection amongst people that self harm, encouraging alternative methods of coping.

For more information, or to find out how to buy our workbook, please follow this link.

Out of Harm's Way DVD Harmless DVD

Out of Harm's Way. Through the eyes of those with first hand experience, we examine the nature of self harm, distress and recovery. A resource both for those that self harm and for professionals.

For more information, or to find out how to buy our DVD, please follow this link.


“We are facing a crisis”: Lady Gaga delivers passionate speech on mental health and suicide Credit: Tommaso Boddi/Getty Images Lady Gaga delivered a passionate speech on mental health and suicide, saying “we are losing a generation of young people”. The ‘Shallow’ singer addressed the SAG-AFTRA Foundation’s 3rd annual Patron of the Artists Awards, at which she was honoured. Her 23-minute acceptance speech for wining the Artists Inspiration Award covered her own mental health issues, her fears for young musicians and artists struggling to voice their struggles, and her plans to build future programmes. “We are losing a generation of young people who do not believe that their voices are worth hearing, that their pain has no end,” she said. “And that their contributions are not valuable enough to move the needle in society and culture. We are facing a crisis of epic proportions and the cause of that crisis is our inability or unwillingness to be open and honest about one thing – mental health, today.” While the singer urged people to focus on kindness, she also noted the reluctance people still have to discuss mental health issues publicly. “When I give speeches about kindness, people have lively engaged discussions but when I speak about mental health, even or especially when I’m speaking about mine, it is often met with quietness,” she said. “Or maybe a somber line of fans waiting outside to whisper to me in the shadows about their darkest secrets. “We need to bring mental health into the light. We need to share our stories so that global mental health no longer resides and festers in the darkness. It is dangerous and we know this because amongst other shootings and acts of violence.” This isn’t the first time Gaga has spoken out about mental health. In October, she penned an emotional essay about the urgent need for more mental health services across the globe – as well as calling for the stigma surrounding mental illness to end. At the awards ceremony, Gaga set out her plan for a specific mental health programme that doesn’t simply respond to emergency situation or focus on medical answers. “By the year 2030, I wish for everybody to have their person that they can talk to who is an expert and can help them. I am beckoning for this because it is perceived by many that mental health is only talked about in the midst of crisis or when something needs to be fixed. I want teams in place to provide prevention. “We need to not only think in terms of doctors, billable hours and hospital stays but protective and preventative care for ourselves and each other, holistically. Do you have a mental health team? Who is on it? Who are the people you can turn to? What are the activities that can reduce our stress?” She also paid tribute to her mental health team, saying “I have learned now are treatable and I can stop living in fear and begin living with bravery.” “And after working as hard as I possibly could to achieve my dreams, slowly but surely the word “yes,” “yes,” “sure,” became too automatic,” she continued. “And my inner voice shut down which I have learned now is very unhealthy. I was not empowered to say no.” Read more at https://www.nme.com/news/music/lady-gaga-speech-mental-health-2400575#TitD8ZBT20RjsFBU.99


Music helps to build the brains of very premature babies Summary: Music specially composed for preterm babies helps strengthen the development of neural networks and may help to limit neurodevelopmental delays often experienced by those born prematurely. Source: University of Geneva In Switzerland, as in most industrialized countries, nearly 1% of children are born “very prematurely”, i.e. before the 32nd week of pregnancy, which represents about 800 children yearly. While advances in neonatal medicine now give them a good chance of survival, these children are however at high risk of developing neuropsychological disorders. To help the brains of these fragile newborns develop as well as possible despite the stressful environment of intensive care, researchers at the University of Geneva (UNIGE) and the University Hospitals of Geneva (HUG), Switzerland, propose an original solution: music written especially for them. And the first results, published in the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences (PNAS) in the United States, are surprising: medical imaging reveals that the neural networks of premature infants who have listened to this music, and in particular a network involved in many sensory and cognitive functions, are developing much better. The Neonatal Intensive Care Unit at the HUG welcomes each year 80 children born far too early – between 24 and 32 weeks of pregnancy, i.e. almost four months ahead of schedule for some of them. The vast majority will survive, but half will later develop neurodevelopmental disorders, including learning difficulties, attentional or emotional disorders. “At birth, these babies’ brains are still immature. Brain development must, therefore, continue in the intensive care unit, in an incubator, under very different conditions than if they were still in their mother’s womb,” explains Petra Hüppi, professor at the UNIGE Faculty of Medicine and Head of the HUG Development and Growth Division, who directed this work. “Brain immaturity, combined with a disturbing sensory environment, explains why neural networks do not develop normally.” A tailor-made music The Geneva researchers started from a practical idea: since the neural deficits of premature babies are due, at least in part, to unexpected and stressful stimuli as well as to a lack of stimuli adapted to their condition, their environment should be enriched by introducing pleasant and structuring stimuli. As the hearing system is functional early on, music appeared to be a good candidate. But which music? “Luckily, we met the composer Andreas Vollenweider, who had already conducted musical projects with fragile populations and who showed great interest in creating music suitable for premature children,” says Petra Hüppi. Lara Lordier, PhD in neurosciences and researcher at the HUG and UNIGE, unfolds the musical creation process. “It was important that these musical stimuli were related to the baby’s condition. We wanted to structure the day with pleasant stimuli at appropriate times: music to accompany their awakening, music to accompany their falling asleep, and music to interact during the awakening phases.” To choose instruments suitable for these very young patients, Andreas Vollenweider played many kinds of instruments to the babies, in the presence of a nurse specialized in developmental support care. “The instrument that generated the most reactions was the Indian snake charmers’ flute (the punji),” recalls Lara Lordier. “Very agitated children calmed down almost instantly, their attention was drawn to the music!” The composer thus wrote three sound environments of eight minutes each, with punji, harp and bells pieces. More efficient brain functional connections through music The study was conducted in a double-blind study, with a group of premature infants who listened to the music, a control group of premature infants, and a control group of full-term newborns to assess whether the brain development of premature infants who had listened to the music would be more similar to that of full-term babies. Scientists used functional MRI at rest on all three groups of children. Without music, premature babies generally had poorer functional connectivity between brain areas than full-term babies, confirming the negative effect of prematurity. “The most affected network is the salience network which detects information and evaluates its relevance at a specific time, and then makes the link with the other brain networks that must act. This network is essential, both for learning and performing cognitive tasks as well as in social relationships or emotional management,” says Lara Lordier. In intensive care, children are overwhelmed by stimuli unrelated to their condition: doors open and close, alarms are triggered, etc. Unlike a full-term baby who, in utero, adjusts its rhythm to that of its mother, the premature baby in intensive care can hardly develop the link between the meaning of a stimulus in a specific context. On the other hand, the neural networks of children who heard Andreas Vollenweider’s music were significantly improved: the functional connectivity between the salience network and auditory, sensorimotor, frontal, thalamus and precuneus networks, was indeed increased, resulting in brain networks organisation more similar to that of full-term infants. When children grow up The first children enrolled in the project are now 6 years old, at which age cognitive problems begin to be detectable. Scientists will now meet again their young patients to conduct a full cognitive and socio-emotional assessment and observe whether the positive outcomes measured in their first weeks of life have been sustained. https://neurosciencenews.com/music-brain-preterm-babies-14095/?fbclid=IwAR1ywsbBy0catSGA-krLkdI6DmB3RVO9lF6NqWMqh-Et0T15J2zuo3dLnKE

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“We are facing a crisis”: Lady Gaga delivers passionate speech on mental health and suicide Posted Monday 17th June 2019

Credit: Tommaso Boddi/Getty Images Lady Gaga delivered a passionate speech on mental health and suicide, saying “we are losing a generation of young people”. The ‘Shallow’ singer addressed the SAG-AFTRA Foundation’s 3rd annua

Music helps to build the brains of very premature babies Posted Friday 14th June 2019

Summary: Music specially composed for preterm babies helps strengthen the development of neural networks and may help to limit neurodevelopmental delays often experienced by those born prematurely. Source: University of Geneva In Switzerl

You Can’t Change or Fix People, So Listen Instead Posted Thursday 13th June 2019

“When people talk, listen completely. Most people never listen.” ~Ernest Hemingway The chances are good that at some point in your life you had to deal with a loved one who consistently frustrated you. They were caught in a destructive

Join us Tuesday 18th June for FREE CPD accredited Module 1 mental health and suicide awareness training Posted Wednesday 12th June 2019

Who – Members of the community and volunteer’s What – FREE mental health and suicide awareness training When – Tuesday 18th June 2019 Where – The Well, Hospital Road, Retford, DN22 7BD Why – to increase awareness of people i